Chocolate Ginger Snap Cookies

Chocolate Gingersnaps | BakeNQuilt.com

Did you know that November 21st is National Gingerbread day?  I didn’t, until it popped up on my feed this morning.  It was a nice coincidence that I made these Chocolate Ginger Snap cookies yesterday from the Mast Brothers Chocolate: A Family Cookbook.  I just picked up a copy and it was the first recipe that called to me to try.  While I think the name is a bit of a misnomer – the cookies aren’t overwhelmingly chocolate nor are they snappy in texture, they are the most delicious ginger cookie I’ve had in a long time.  The tablespoon of cocoa powder and the bittersweet chocolate chips added to the batter make the chocolate ginger snap cookie rich but not overwhelmingly chocolate.  This is definitely a ginger cookie not a chocolate cookie – the use of both ground and fresh ginger give it a lovely bite.  As with all of my holiday cookies, I rolled them in sparkling decorator sugar which makes them look beautiful (not so much in my poor winter lighting) and gives them a nice crunch.  They were delicious as a breakfast bite along with an iced gingerbread latte.  Don’t judge me…

I am submitting these to We Should Cocoa this month.

We_Should_Cocoa_V3

5.0 from 1 reviews
Chocolate Ginger Snap Cookies
Author: 
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: American
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 24
 
Rich and flavorful ginger cookies with a hint of chocolate
Ingredients
  • ½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • ½ cup dark brown sugar
  • ¼ cup molasses
  • 2 teaspoons water
  • 3 tablespoons grated fresh ginger
  • 1½ cups all purpose unbleached flour
  • 1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 7½ ounces bittersweet chocolate chips
  • 1 cup sparkling decorator sugar (or regular sugar) spread in a dish
Instructions
  1. Cream the butter and sugar together until light and fluffy.
  2. Add the fresh ginger, water and molasses and beat until combined.
  3. Add in the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda and spices and mix on low just until combined.
  4. Fold in the chocolate chips.
  5. Wrap the dough in plastic and refrigerate for at least 2 hours or overnight.
  6. Preheat the oven to 350F/176C.
  7. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.
  8. Scoop the dough into 1½" balls, roll in the sugar to coat and place on the baking sheets.
  9. Bake for 14-15 minutes, until just set, rotating sheets halfway through baking.
  10. Transfer the cookies on the paper to a wire rack to cool completely.

 

 

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Impressionist Quilt

Impressionis Quilt | BakeNQuilt.com

At the Museum – Impressionist Quilt panel

Years ago, some friends gave me a fabric panel from Exclusively Quilting that had 6 impressionist paintings on it.  The panel sat around my sewing room for a long time because it was so pretty on its own I was afraid to cut it up.  I finally gave it to my round robin quilting group and they did not disappoint (thank you Kim, Dorothy, Regina, Joyce, Pam and Peggy)!

I have belonged to my round robin group at the Amador Valley Quilt Guild for about 8 years now and they are always creative and push me to be creative too.  We have no rules except those decided by the person who submits the project.  Each person works on the project in random order and then the owner pulls it whenever they feel it is done.  The group took each painting in my impressionist painters panel and cut it out of its original plain black background and framed each print in a way that related to the painting featured.  When I got it back, there weren’t quite enough blocks to make a good sized quilt though.  I searched online and found a companion panel on Ebay with a different set of paintings and used those to add 3 of my own blocks to create this 9×9 block, 53″x56″ wall quilt.

This was probably the hardest quilt I have ever machine quilted – I do not recommend black thread on black fabric!  However, it was forgiving and didn’t show my stitching mistakes.  I tried a completely machine-pieced binding for the first time with great success.  The flanged binding piece is stitched to the back of the quilt, then wrapped around to the top and stitched in the ditch around the edges to fasten it down.  I was done in less than a half hour and I really like how it looks on this quilt.

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