Momofuku Milk Bar Compost Cookies

A few weeks ago I checked out the Momofuku Milk Bar cookbook from the library.  I’ve never been to the Momofuku Milk Bar in New York, but it’s been featured on enough cooking shows and talk shows to make me interested in the cookbook.  Chef Christina Tosi is a very creative lady and the cookbook is interesting to read.  A lot of the desserts in this book are completely unlike anything I’ve ever eaten.  Many of the recipes require other recipes to be made first as ingredients, so it’s definitely not an impromptu baking book or one for impatient bakers (ahem).

Anyway, I made three of the easier recipes from this cookbook before the library demanded it back.  The first thing I made was Cornflake Crunch, a buttery and rich toasted cornflake snack which was a required ingredient for the second recipe I tried, Cornflake-Chocolate Chip-Marshmallow Cookies.  While I loved the Cornflake Crunch, I really didn’t like the Cornflake-Chocolate Chip-Marshmallow Cookies as they turned out far too sweet, crispy and rich for my tastes.  It was with apprehension that I then tried the Compost Cookies which is one of Momofuku’s more popular cookies.  These cookies did not disappoint!  Often called Kitchen Sink Cookies or Garbage Cookies, Compost Cookies are a basic chocolate chip type of batter with all kinds of snack items mixed in.  In this case, chocolate chips, butterscotch chips, coffee, pretzels, oatmeal, graham cracker pie crust and potato chips (yes, don’t knock it ’till you’ve tried it) are mixed into the rich dough.  The saltiness of the treats helps balance out the sweetness of the dough and the crunch is nice too.   I confess that I did not have the patience to make the pie crust and mash up 1/4 of it for the recipe, but the cookies were still excellent with 1/2 cup of crushed graham crackers instead.   Someday I will make it to NY to Momofuku Milk Bar, but until then I’ll keep making these cookies!

Momofuku Milk Bar Compost Cookies
Author: 
Recipe type: Dessert
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 15-20
 
Rich cookie batter filled with chocolate chips, butterscotch chips, coffee, pretzels, potato chips, oatmeal and graham cracker pieces.
Ingredients
  • 2 sticks (225 grams) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 1 cup (200 grams) granulated sugar
  • 2⁄3 cup (150 grams), tightly packed light brown sugar
  • 2 Tbsp. glucose or light corn syrup
  • 1 egg
  • ½ tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1⅓ cups (225 grams) flour
  • ½ tsp. baking powder
  • ¼ tsp. baking soda
  • 1 tsp. kosher salt
  • ¾ cup (150 grams) mini chocolate chips
  • ½ cup (100 grams) mini butterscotch chips
  • ¼ recipe Graham Cracker Crust or ½ cup graham cracker crumbs
  • ⅓ cup (40 grams) old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 2½ tsp. ground coffee
  • 2 cups (50 grams) potato chips
  • 1 cup (50 grams) mini pretzels
Instructions
  1. Combine the butter, sugars and glucose or corn syrup in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and cream together on medium-high for 2 to 3 minutes. Scrape down the sides of the bowl, add the egg and vanilla, and beat for 7 to 8 minutes.
  2. Reduce the speed to low and add the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Mix just until the dough comes together, no longer than 1 minute. (Do not walk away from the machine during this step, or you will risk over-mixing the dough.) Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a spatula.
  3. Still on low speed, add the chocolate chips, butterscotch chips, graham cracker crust or crumbs, oats and coffee, and mix just until incorporated, about 30 seconds. Add the potato chips and pretzels, and paddle, still on low speed, until just incorporated. Be careful not to over-mix or break too many of the pretzels or potato chips.
  4. Using a 2-ounce ice cream scoop (or a 1⁄3-cup measure), portion out the dough onto a parchment-lined sheet pan. Pat the tops of the cookie dough domes flat. Wrap the sheet pan tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour, or up to 1 week. You may also freeze the dough. Do not bake your cookies from room temperature—they will not bake properly.
  5. Heat the oven to 375°F.
  6. Arrange the chilled dough a minimum of 4 inches apart on parchment- or Silpat-lined sheet pans. Bake for 18 minutes. The cookies will puff, crackle and spread. After 18 minutes, they should be very faintly browned on the edges yet still bright yellow in the center. Give them an extra minute or so if that’s not the case.
  7. Cool the cookies completely on the sheet pans before transferring to a plate or an airtight container for storage. At room temp, cookies will keep fresh for 5 days; in the freezer, they will keep for 1 month.
Notes
Be sure to beat the batter for the required length of time or the cookies will not cook correctly. The dough needs to be very fluffy. Also be sure to chill the dough fully before baking. I had the best luck baking the dough directly from the freezer. Kosher salt is less salty than table salt, so if you’re not using kosher salt you may want to use less.

 

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2 Responses to Momofuku Milk Bar Compost Cookies

  1. Victoria says:

    I found your blog through google alerts, ny, quilts, cookies… and this popped up. Living here in NYC, and a having been to MOMOFUKO, I can tell you, YUM! love the cookies and also their ice cream called “Cereal Milk”… yep. that’s a recipe I’ d love to have, too. Salty sweet milk like a the end of a bowl full of cheerios… super yummy…. Didnt’ even know though that there was a cookbook.. i beterr get that on my xmas list!

  2. Rebecca says:

    You’ll be happy with this book then! The cereal milk ice cream is there as well as several other recipes with cereal milk. Make sure you get the Milk Bar cookbook though, not the main restaurant cookbook.

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